Tag Archives: chatbots

I have discussed chatbots at length in my earlier posts (see Chatbots are coming your way: Start moving now!, Chatbots for wealth management, trade execution, and portfolio management? Yes, please!, Why (chat)bots are so exciting?, and Chatbots: The future of customer service?). There is no lack of pretty good commentary and viewpoints when it comes to chatbots, and various chatbot platforms have spawned in Europe, US, and Asia-Pacific. As I have argued in my earlier article around a week ago, Facebook has played a prominent role in the emergence of chatbots. There have been some news that Facebook has recently decided to scale down their initial plans in regards to chatbots as chatbots are not living up to initial expectations. Nonetheless, it has been remarkable that tens of thousands of chatbots have been created on the top of Messenger, and Facebook has allowed aspiring chatbot designers to experiment with a variety of…

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There has been a lot of interesting discussion on how bots, and especially chatbots, could redefine the future of customer service and customer experience. The rise of bots has been exceptionally fast, and Facebook played a significant role in the chatbot revolution when they announced in April 2016 that Facebook Messenger platform supports chatbots – the number of chatbots on Facebook Messenger has been growing fast. We have been living in the world of (chat)bots for a couple of years now, and Facebook’s adoption of chatbots has been a significant landmark in the more general adoption of bots. There has already been some evidence that chatbots are gaining legitimacy amongst consumers. According to Aspect Software Research’s report published last year, “44% said that if a company could get the experience right, they would prefer to use a chatbot or automated experience for CRM.” This discussion has been, of course, promoted mainly by those…

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In my earlier posts, I barely scratched the surface of chatbot revolution in customer service. There are ultimately various reasons why chatbots have become to dominate the discussion on the future of customer service, and why engaging the revolution of conversational user interfaces is so important. Customer service, per definition, requires one to assume a generalist role in the organizational matrix, i.e. it’s not just about receiving inputs and generating outputs based on logically construed rules but rather it requires one to be able to offer service (not a service). It’s no wonder that customer service roles are often perceived as stressful, and of course, different client-facing service positions require a different set of personal and organizational measures to prevent excess stress (Sidle 2004; St-Vincent, Denis, Imbeau & Trudeau 2006; Julian 2008). As a 2005 study published by British scientists points out, “Of the 26 occupations included in the research, … customer services…

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It’s not particularly uncommon to come across organizations, businesses, and people who still implicitly perceive customer support and customer service as something not really worth investing in. Just a couple of days ago, I faced a problem with a Nordic low-cost airline carrier that has almost every year won several prizes and other forms of recognition. My problem was that I was unable to change my password on their website; I followed the instructions to reset my email, and after I couldn’t do this by myself, I decided to give them a call to get it done. I didn’t have to wait a long time to talk with an agent, but then the problems started. The agent was unable to retrieve my information, and I had to spell my name out in various ways. I don’t consider myself as fluent as a native English speaker, but I always get things…

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